Bremen is a selection of field recordings that I took systematically during approximately sixty days at that city in the north of Germany. For over ten years
I have the habit of doing this kind of records in each place I go. Custom and obsession with exercise this practice routinely changed the way I listen, establishing the idea of unlock the potential of sounds as the main engine to produce and develop this recordings. Even tough considering any sound as music is an idea embodied long time ago, I find new-fangled everything that holds the possibility of reinterpret itself tirelessly.
In terms of the production process, I have two ways to capture sounds outside the studio: a premeditated one, in which I follow in detail a plan made before, some sort of sonic excursions seeking to catch new sounds in different locations; and the other, more unpredictable and haphazard, where I find myself in a sound event that seduces me and spontaneously decide to register it.
As a composer, I feel the need to increase the perception of listeners by developing ways to explore sounds, generating an expanded music, opening the ears of the public, not only towards something new, but also taking the history as a fertile component to reformulate.
I hope that listeners have the ability and the suspicion of hear. I consider that sounds are not good or bad, I don’t believe in a moral sound. We’ve all heard this kind of sounds anytime, however, none of each is repeated in the same way twice. There is a collective sound memory that changes in an imperceptible way.
Bremen is just a small selection of many sounds that I usually record, reproduce and hear. I suspect that I do it thinking that any time a sound disappears, we tend to forget it.

Ulises Conti: Sennheiser MKH 416, Tascam DR100
Diego Lezcano: Edition and Mastering
Mercedes D’Angelo: Art

Produced by Ulises Conti
Published by Metamusica